Writer’s Block

writer's block, writing, blank

Writer’s block is one of the most annoying/horrific things that can occur. Whether writing a paper for a class or composing a poem for fun, there is nothing more stressful or time consuming than writer’s block.

For me, I’ve been stuck on things to create for this blog. Without much former blogging experience or set schedule for posting content, I just post things on a whim.

While I like having the freedom to do anything, whenever I want, that doesn’t help me stay inspired and create new content. It’s the forced, “Oh my god, I have no time!” feeling that keeps me going and makes me rush through a barrage of ideas.

While luckily, writer’s block is less prevalent for writing news stories, there are situations where I have no clue what the next step should be, or how I can fill some extra space with meaningful content.

Sometimes I just want to stick in a bland quote here or there and call it a day, but that doesn’t solve the true issue behind writer’s block, does it?

From Columbia University comes a great series of writing tips called “Break Writing.” I would suggest looking through them if you want tips on how to be a great writer, but for the particular page I linked, there are various tips and tricks on how to break past “writer’s block.”

One of the best tips they provided however was, “Just keep writing.”

No matter if it’s an utter mass of garbage, the act of thinking through something and typing it down gives enough momentum for something spectacular to conjure up.

For every crappy few paragraphs one writes, there has to be a shiny great sentence underneath the rest of the trash.

When I’m over-critical of myself, I find myself doubting my abilities and unable to create an idea that I find worthy.

I find that the great writers I’ve met in my life often have this problem. They start on a project, deem the content worthless and then decide to throw it all away when they can’t come up with what they consider magnificent.

Why do we do that to ourselves?

Creating something from nothing is always strenuous and extremely personal. When I write short stories for fun, I judge myself harshly for my work and consider what other people would think if they read my piece.

As writers, we are our own worst enemy. We are asked to delve into the depths of our minds and lay out a piece of ourselves, even if it’s fiction or non-fiction. It’s terrifying being asked to explain ourselves in words, and worse when we are misunderstood. It’s no wonder that writers often find themselves in a rut. We put so much pressure on ourselves that the free flow of ideas are hindered by nervousness and stress.

And that is why, for myself, being on a time crunch where I don’t have time to over-analyze myself is helpful when creating work. I wish I didn’t have to do that since I feel like I could create higher quality pieces with more time, but we have to deal with our own faults.

The best way to get through writer’s block? While it sounds ironic, just keep writing.

So I ask, when faced with writer’s block, how do you escape from it?

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4 thoughts on “Writer’s Block

  1. Zen says:

    I completely abandon my writing when I have writer’s block; I can never just “keep writing”, because that only frustrates me and I feel the urgent need to just delete everything because it sucks. Instead I occupy myself with other things like books, movies, food… and maybe other WIPs.

    • linhta7 says:

      That also sounds like a good idea for getting through writer’s block. I also find that letting the piece sit and clearing my mind is helpful.

  2. Matthew says:

    For me, it depends what I’m writing. If it’s something more personal, I tend to set it aside and wait for inspiration. If it’s something like a college essay, though, I make an outline of what I want to write and just write anything, with the intention of improving it later during the editing phase. So long as it has the bare bones, I can move forward, and I can make it look pretty later.

    • linhta7 says:

      Outlines are definitely beneficial. There have been many a time where I’ve been stuck, but after jotting some thoughts down and creating a structured outline, the ideas start flowing!

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